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DESIGN & STYLE

ASOS Will Ban Mohair, Silk, Cashmere and Feathers From Its Range From 2019

"ASOS firmly believes it is not acceptable for animals to suffer in the name of fashion or cosmetics."
By Kat Hayes
June 24, 2018
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ASOS Will Ban Mohair, Silk, Cashmere and Feathers From Its Range From 2019

"ASOS firmly believes it is not acceptable for animals to suffer in the name of fashion or cosmetics."
By Kat Hayes
June 24, 2018
  shares

Global retail site ASOS has announced that, as of 2019, it will not sell garments derived from animal products such as silk, cashmere, mohair and feathers.

The news was revealed via an update to the brand's animal welfare policy, with the company stating "ASOS firmly believes it is not acceptable for animals to suffer in the name of fashion or cosmetics."

With a growth last year of 30% in their sales across major markets, ASOS is quickly growing in popularity and its reach — started in the UK in 2000, it now spans across multiple regions with designated sites in Australia, USA, France, Germany and others, as well as shipping to 140 countries. It's massive, and chances are you've bought a dress or a coat or six versions of the same t-shirt all in different colours from the retailer.

The news falls in alignment with changing attitudes and expectations towards animal welfare in regards to fashion production. ASOS' animal welfare policy also notes that "all animal materials used must be by-products of the meat industry. ASOS is committed to working with industry expert groups to support the ongoing research, development and implementation of animal welfare standards and transparency in the leather supply chain."

Products made from mohair (which comes from angora goats), cashmere (from cashmere goats), silk (made by silkworms) and down (feathers closest to a birds skin) will be banned — as well as feathers themselves — adding to ASOS' existing ban on using fur and angora. Products that use teeth and bone, including mother-of-pearl, will also be halted.

PETA has applauded the move and, as well as global brands like Gucci and Versace jumping aboard with banning fur, a number of local Australian brands are adding their voices too.

Published on June 24, 2018 by Kat Hayes

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