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By Meg Watson
September 06, 2014
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By Meg Watson
September 06, 2014
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It's been five years since the Yeah Yeah Yeahs last album, and a few more than that since you belted out the lyrics to 'Gold Lion' in your high school bedroom or beat-down first car. Admit it: everyone wanted to be Karen O at some point in their lives. Now, this phenomenal queen of indie rock has once again proven how swoon-worthy she really is. Not only has she made a debut solo album full of lo-fi love tunes, she's previewing the entire thing online now ahead of its release.

We're not going to be offended if you leave us now to listen to it.

Streaming as part of NPR's First Listen program, the soon to be released Crush Songs is far from the indie anthems and general kickassery of her time as lead singer of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Instead, it draws heavily on the work she's done for film soundtracks in recent years. From the uplifting style of 'All is Love' in Where the Wild Things Are to the delicate ukelele-backed 'Moon Song' from Her, Karen O's solo work has drawn surprising comparisons to the likes of Juno-famous Kimya Dawson.

Although this is the singer's first solo album, Crush Songs was actually recorded way back in 2006 and 2007. A deeply personal collection of stories, Karen O recorded these songs in private aside from her work with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Drawing on the album's appropriate name, the songs explore the singer's fears she'll never find love because she has too many crushes.

Officially released on September 9 in the US, Crush Songs will also feature original drawings and hand-written lyrics from the legendary singer. Even if you're a die-hard fan of her work in the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, this is worth a listen. All in all, it's nice to know that even bona fide rock legends once scribbled people's names in little hand-drawn hearts.

Via NPR. Stream the whole album here.

Published on September 06, 2014 by Meg Watson

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