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Bouillon L'Entrecôte

Hidden away above Quay Quarter Lanes, this decadent French restaurant specialises in steak frites with its secret sauce and ultra-cheesy soufflé.
By Ben Hansen
May 30, 2022
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By Ben Hansen
May 30, 2022
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In 2016, Brasserie L'Entrecôte opened in Pymble, bringing a slice of French decadence to the north shore. In the six years since, there's been a bit of a French boom in Sydney with Swillhouse's Restaurant Hubert, Dan Pepperell's Bistrot 916 and brand-new editions like Whalebridge and Loulou joining the city's French offerings. While many of these spots are bringing a flashy Sydney flair to their take on French cuisine, Brasserie L'Entrecôte — and its new sibling venue Bouillon L'Entrecôte — celebrate tradition, serving up classic dishes done incredibly well.

Bouillon L'Entrecôte has opened in Circular Quay's new dining precinct Quay Quarter Lanes alongside a slew of exciting new venues including Besuto, Hinchcliff House and Londres 126. On entry, you're met with a ground level with a selection of tables looking out into Circular Quay. Head upstairs and the building opens up to an expansive dining room with a grand French fit-out. Luxurious detailing and large dining tables are complemented with art and photographs sprawled across the wall — headlined by a huge portrait of legendary French chef Paul Bocuse.

When it comes to the food, the options are varied but not overwhelming. Kick things off with your choice of starters and a glass of kir royale ($22) from the 'How To Be a Good French' section of the drinks menu. Highlights from the hors d'oeuvre include the escargot ($29) drenched in a rich sauce, the ultra-cheesy twice-baked soufflé ($24) and the seared scallops ($28) served with foie gras mousse, onion jam and truffle oil.

The house specialty is the 200-gram sirloin steak ($42) served with french fries, walnut green salad and the kitchen's famous secret sauce — owner Johan Giausseran, nor the chefs, will give up the secret to the sauce's recipe, no matter how hard you might prod. Those looking to elevate the night even further can look to share the 850-gram T-bone ($145) or the huge 1.7-kilogram wagyu tomahawk ($265).

There are also weekly specials available for $38, ranging from beef bourguignon cooked overnight to wagyu beef sausages and the catch of the day.

While the food is kept to a succinct selection of classics, the drinks menu stretches across 25 pages, ranging from French cocktails and sangria to aperitifs and plenty of wine, of course.

If you have the courage to fit more in after your mains, the dessert menu is difficult to resist. The centrepiece is the thrice-baked caramelised upside-down apple tart ($34), only eight are baked each week, but other standouts include the rich vanilla ice cream and chocolate profiteroles ($18) and the vanilla créme bûlée ($17).

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