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FOOD & DRINK

Frenchies Bistro and Brewery

Parisian bistronomy and local brewing come together at this newish spot run by two ‘Frenchies’ with a penchant for culinary delights.
By James Whitton
December 04, 2017
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Frenchies Bistro and Brewery

Parisian bistronomy and local brewing come together at this newish spot run by two ‘Frenchies’ with a penchant for culinary delights.
By James Whitton
December 04, 2017
  shares
BOOK A TABLE

Close your eyes and imagine French cooking. For many of us, our minds will wander to tartare de boeuf, duck à l'orange, croissants, frogs legs and snails. Unfortunately, this doesn't cover the full scope of French cuisine. Much of the modern French cuisine, served outside of France, is a hollow caricature of the true nature of the national gastronomy. At Frenchies, however, they've veered away from the dishes that haunt the tourist traps along the Champs-Élysées, and instead offer a broader adventure into the tradition of French culinary arts.

The beers brewed upstairs at Frenchies deserve a review unto themselves and, luckily, there's enough time here to wax lyrically about the raspberry saison. It delicately traipses the fine line between traditional and left of field. The countryside terrine from the bar menu, a dish that dates back hundreds of years — including a stint as the meal of choice in Napoleon's armies — is an excellent accompaniment. The savoury meat supports the sweet and tart elements of the beer, and the composition of ingredients in the terrine create a delightfully juxtaposed texture.

Dishes like mackerel served on a broad, white plate, drizzled in consommé, with a symphony of salt-roasted vegetables on the side, convey that  food must not only be cooked to perfection (it invariably is), but it's got to look great, too. The risotto is served with two halves of roasted artichokes, seasoned flawlessly, and the infallible duo of balsamic vinegar and parmesan. The wine list, too, is varied to please every palate, and features a host of Australian wines that show off characteristics inherent in French winemaking.

Head chef and co-owner Thomas Cauquil trained at Michelin-starred restaurants across Europe. Together with Vincent de Soyres, business partner, fellow French-expat and beer expat, he's helping to revitalise the French bistronomy scene in Sydney.

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